first official shoot with fujifilm x-h1

On St Patrick's Day I took the new X-H1 for a spin to shoot Sheryl & Dan's engagement at Gantry Plaza State Park in Long Island City. It was a cold but sunny day and I was worried about the harsh daylight since late afternoon was not an option for the couple. But it all turned out well, and the X-H1 did not disappoint: it was lightning fast - I used two Sony SF-G64/T1 High Performance SDXC UHS-II Class 10 U3 cards so there were no lagging or lockup issues many other X-H1 users have been reporting. 

Here's a photofilm that highlights the day:

ricoh to nikon to canon to fujifilm x

ricoh to nikon to canon to fujifilm x

My first camera was a Ricoh film camera which my big brother gave me as a gift when I turned 15. I took that camera everywhere, and mostly photographed my friends and my travels to the US and Israel. I grew up and was living in Istanbul, Turkey back then.  

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how it all began

how it all began

My first recollection of being impressed by graphic design - without knowing what it meant yet - were vynl and cassette tape cover art in the 80s, when I was about 9 or 10. My father had a collection of mostly classical music, and my brother introduced me to pop music - he used to bring me cassette tapes of artists and bands that I might like. 

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my first documentary-style wedding shoot

my first documentary-style wedding shoot

Last week a good friend of mine asked me to shoot his civil ceremony and spend the day with them. So before the wedding day, I did some research on how to utilize my Fujifilm X-T1 and the XF-56mm lens (85mm equivalent), along with the X100T which has a 23mm (35mm equivalent). I shot a couple of other small weddings with my 5D Mark III before successfully, but I was looking to achieve the more "soulful" images that I believe Fujifilm is able to produce. 

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istanbul (not constantinople)

istanbul (not constantinople)

I moved from Istanbul to the US on May second, two thousand. I was twenty five. I moved for a better life - where I wasn’t forced to serve the army, and where I wasn’t oppressed for being gay. This move meant that I wasn’t to go back home for a long, unknown amount of time, due to citizenship and army service issues.

After eleven years, Turkey passed a law that allowed payment in exchange of army service and I was finally free to go back home! In these eleven years, I missed many a wedding of my nieces, friends, and births of my grand-nephews and my friends’ babies… It was finally time to make up for all those years away from Home.

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